Lab 8 preparation

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Lab 8 preparation

Post  hwilson on Sun Nov 30, 2008 5:20 pm

2.)The string in the setup sketched above is a rubber band which stretches sizeably under tension.
You measured the mass of the string placing it, removed from the set, on a scale.
Select all correct statements:



There are 6 wavelengths of the standing wave fitting into the distance

The length of string relevant for the calculation of the standing wave frequency is

If you decrease the number of wavelengths fitting into the distance , the frequency
of the standing wave increases

The linear mass density is independent of the mass

The length of the string relevant for the calculation of the linear mass density is

The length of the string can be measured when the string is without tension (relaxed)
How to solve: ?

3.) (Below use symbols from the skectch above, use Lprime for L' and mu for u)

Enter the equation for the traveling wave velocity on a String in terms of the string tension T and the
linear mass density u of the string (see Ch 10 sheet 20)

(1) v =

Enter the equation which defines the linear mass density (see Ch 10 sheet 22)

(2) u =

Enter the equation for string tension in terms of the suspended mass . The suspended mass
is not accelerated but at rest (see Ch 4 sheet 21 equation (2) for acceleration = 0)

(3) T =

How to solve: ?

6.)Give the expression for the standing wave resonance frequencies fn on a string in terms of the
traveling wave velocity v, the length of the string (see the sketch above) and the number of half waves n
on the string (see Ch 10 sheet 19):
(Use symbols from the sketch above if needed, L for L and L' for L' )

(4) fn =

Later you graph the frequencies fn vs the number of half waves n and determine the slope k of this
graph. Write the equation (4) above such that you can, comparing your equation with the equation of a
straight line you remember from Algebra (y = m x) , identify the slope k in equation (4) and equate
k to this term. Solve this relation for the traveling wave velocity v and give that equation below:

(5) v =

Thus, in the Execution part of this lab, you can determine the traveling wave velocity v and compare its
value with the value you obtained in the Execution Part I using equation (1).

How to solve: ?

8.)In order to vary the tension in the string you vary the mass M suspended from the string. The
resonance frequency f3 (3 half waves) is easy to observe with this string. For various suspended
masses M you plot f3^2 vs the mass M, which is a linear graph (see the linear relation between f3^2
and M below).
In order to get this linear relation combine equations (1) and (3) of question "Lab 8 Part I Traveling
Wave Velocity on String" and equation (4) of question "Lab 8 Part II Standing Wave Frequencies on a
String" to get an equation of the form f3^2= [ ... ] M. The term [ ... ] contains the gravitational
acceleration g. Give this equation below:
(Use symbols from the sketch above, use mu for u.)

(6) f3^2 = xM

How to solve:?

9.)Identify in the answer to question "Lab 8 Part III Dependence of the Standing Wave Frequency on the
Suspended Mass M", f3^2= [ ... ] M, the term representing the slope k of the f3^2 vs M graph, set it
equal to k and solve for the graviational acceleration g in terms of the slope k.
Give this relation below:
(Use mu for u. )

(7) g =

How to solve:?

hwilson
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prep

Post  lab8 on Mon Dec 01, 2008 12:32 am

what is 2 3 6 8 9???

lab8
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question 2

Post  periwinkle on Mon Dec 01, 2008 2:35 am

the answer for question 2 is:
There are 6 wavelengths of the standing wave fitting into the distance L

periwinkle

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lab 8 execution

Post  just ano on Mon Dec 01, 2008 2:54 am

1. weights = C
Power Supply for Motor = D
Rubber Band = A
Pulley = F
End of Length L for Defining the Wave = I
suspended weight defining tension = B
Ruler = G
PC Terminal with Data and Graph = H
End of Length L' for Linear Mass Density = J
Photo Gate = E

2. the only correct answer is There are 6 wavelengths of the standing wave fitting into the distance

3. [1] sqrt(T/mu)
[2] m/Lprime
[3] M*g

4. Wire Shaking Band up and down = B
Rotating Cylinder with Peg at Edge Attached to Wire Shaking Band = C
Flag Which Blocks Photo Gate Light Beam Every Turn = D
Begin of Length L Defining the Wave = E
Photo Gate = A

5. One Half Wave = D
Location of Maximum Oscillation = C
Node: Location of Zero Oscillation = B
7 Half Waves or 8 Nodes = E
Motor = A

6. [4] n*(v/(2*L))
[5] ???

7. One Half Wave = C
Non-Stretching String = B
50, 100, 150, 200 gram Weights = A
Three Half Waves; n =3 kept constant = D

8. ???
9. ???

just ano
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6, 8,9

Post  lost on Mon Dec 01, 2008 1:07 pm

I'm still not getting the second part of 6 and numbers 8 and 9. Does anyone have an Idea. I've been trying and have still gotten nowhere.

lost
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number 8

Post  student on Mon Dec 01, 2008 1:36 pm

does anyone understand how to do #8?

student
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Re: Lab 8 preparation

Post  xc on Mon Dec 01, 2008 2:51 pm

question 6
[5] v=k*2L

question 8
[6] (f3)^2=(9*g)/(mu*4*L^2)

question 9
g=(k*mu*4*L^2)/9

xc
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Re: Lab 8 preparation

Post  User 87 on Mon Dec 01, 2008 3:40 pm

just remember for the second question for number 6 to write it as v= k*2*L, or the computer will not except it

User 87
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haha

Post  shithead on Tue Dec 02, 2008 1:46 am

Thanks for 8 and 9, those were stumpididididng me hahahahaha

that was crazy hahahahaha

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sas sucker dick sucking piece of crap shit fuuker

shithead
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Physics (Greek: physis – φύσις) is the science of matter[1] and its motion.[2] It is the science that seeks to understand very basic concepts such as force, energy, mass, and charge. More completely, it is the general analysis of nature, conducted in orde

Post  Physics on Tue Dec 02, 2008 1:52 am

Physics (Greek: physis – φύσις) is the science of matter[1] and its motion.[2] It is the science that seeks to understand very basic concepts such as force, energy, mass, and charge. More completely, it is the general analysis of nature, conducted in order to understand how the world around us and, more broadly, the universe, behaves.[3][4] Note that the term 'universe' is defined as everything that physically exists: the entirety of space and time, all forms of matter, energy and momentum, and the physical laws and constants that govern them. However, the term 'universe' may also be used in slightly different contextual senses, denoting concepts such as the cosmos, the world, and nature.

In one form or another, physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines, perhaps the oldest through its inclusion of astronomy.[5] Over the last two millennia, physics had been considered synonymous with philosophy, chemistry, and certain branches of mathematics and biology, but during the Scientific Revolution in the 16th century, it emerged to become a unique modern science in its own right.[6] However, in some subject areas such as in mathematical physics and quantum chemistry, the boundaries and the borderlines of physics remain difficult to distinguish.

Physics is both significant and influential, in part because advances in its understanding have often translated into new technologies, but also because new ideas in physics often resonate with the other sciences, mathematics and philosophy. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism led directly to the development of new products which have dramatically transformed modern-day society (e.g., television, computers, and domestic appliances); advances in thermodynamics led to the development of motorized transport; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of the calculus, quantum chemistry, and the use of instruments like the electron microscope in microbiology.

Today, physics is both a broad and very deep subject that, in practical/fundamental terms, can be split into several subfields. It can also be divided into two conceptually different branches: Theoretical physics and experimental physics. The former deals with the inquiry and foundation of new theories while the latter deals with the experimental testing of these new, or existing, theories. Even though significant progress and important discoveries have been made in the field of physics during the last four centuries, many significant questions about nature and the universe still remain unanswered. In many areas of physics, it is still a continuing effort to try to gain a clearer understanding to the unknown and the outskirts of physics.

Physics
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Re: Lab 8 preparation

Post  hmmm on Wed Dec 03, 2008 7:02 pm

question 6 equation (5) it's saying v=k*2L is wrong...anyone have the proper syntax???

hmmm
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Re: Lab 8 preparation

Post  Wolf on Wed Dec 03, 2008 7:27 pm

for V=k/2l you need to put " k/2*L " try that!! lol!

Wolf
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question 5

Post  JessicaP on Thu Dec 04, 2008 3:23 am

for #5 you have to put it as k*2*L.
it works Very Happy

JessicaP
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Re: Lab 8 preparation

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